The headings of the chapter sections found here are translations of the Greek headings found in the 1918 edition by Heinemann and Loeschcke. Since writings from that time generally did not include chapter sections, it is unlikely that any of these are original to the anonymous author. However, the manuscript evidence suggests that the headings from Book 3 may be older than the ones from the first two books. This page will soon provide links to the individual sections of our translation as they are completed. Please note that these pages do not contain the additional information provided in the footnotes that our full translation of Book 1 does, as will the full translations of the other two books, when they are completed.

Book 1

Book 2

  • 2.1 The peace of the churches of God and the sovereignty of Emperor Consantine after the ungodly Licinius was destroyed
  • 2.2 The heresy invented by Arius, the fighter-against-God
  • 2.3 Bishop Alexander’s decree pronouncing the deposition of Arius and those on his side, which was sent to all the bishops everywhere
  • 2.4 Emperor Constantine’s letter to Alexander and Arius, which was sent through Hosius, the Bishop of Cordova
  • 2.5 The most God-loving Emperor Constantine calls for a council of bishops to be held at Nicaea
  • 2.6 The emperor takes part in the council with the bishops
  • 2.7 The public address of the Emperor Augustus to the holy council
  • 2.8 The emperor receives the petitions of the bishops
  • 2.9 The holy Paphnutius
  • 2.10 The holy Spyridon
  • 2.11 Spyridon’s dead daughter is raised to life on account of a traveler
  • 2.12 Why it is necessary to think and believe that the three persons of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are one, inseparable, indescribable deity
  • 2.13 One of the philosophers on Arius’s side speaks out very strongly against that holy synod of the apostolic priests of God
  • 2.14.1 The counter-argument of another philosopher named Phaedon and his defense of Arius, the fighter-against-God, and the blasphemy he had invented; the interpretation of the phrase “Let us make man” which the philosopher proposed to the holy synod
  • 2.14.2 The response of the holy fathers through Eustathius, Bishop of Antioch
  • 2.14.4 Another reply of the holy fathers through the same Bishop Eustathius
  • 2.14.7 The harmonius response of the holy fathers
  • 2.15.1 The philosopher’s counter-argument on behalf of Arius
  • 2.15.2 The holy bishops give him another explanation through Hosius, the Bishop of the city of Cordova
  • 2.15.6 The philosopher’s counter-argument
  • 2.15.7 The response of the holy synod through the same Hosius, Bishop of the city of Cordova
  • 2.16.1 The philosopher’s counter-argument
  • 2.16.5 The reply of the holy fathers through Leontius, the Bishop of Caesarea Cappadocia and Eupsychius, the Bishop of Tyana
  • 2.16.7 The philosopher’s counter-argument
  • 2.16.8 The reply of the holy fathers through the same bishops, Leontius and Eupsychius
  • 2.16.14 The philosopher’s counter-argument
  • 2.16.15 The reply of the holy fathers through the same God-fearing bishops, Leontius and Eupsychius
  • 2.17.1 The philospher’s counter-argument concerning the phrase from Solomon’s proverbs:  “The Lord created me as the first of his paths for his works”
  • 2.17.2 The response of the holy fathers and bishops through Eusebius Pamphili, the Bishop of Caesarea Palestine
  • 2.17.19 The philosopher
  • 2.17.20 Our holy bishops spoke through the same Bishop Eusebius Pamphili
  • 2.18.1 Another counter-argument of the philosopher
  • 2.18.2 The response of the holy bishops to the philosopher through Bishop Eusebius Pamphili
  • 2.19.1 The philosopher’s counter-argument
  • 2.19.2 The response of the holy bishops through the same Bishop Eusebius Pamphili
  • 2.20.1 The philosopher’s counter-question
  • 2.20.4 The response of the holy bishops through the same Bishop Eusebius Pamphili
  • 2.21.1 The philosopher’s counter-argument against the Holy Spirit
  • 2.21.3 The reply of the fathers through Protogenes, the Bishop of Sardica
  • 2.21.5 The philosopher
  • 2.21.13 More that the holy fathers said through Leontius, the Bishop of Caesarea Cappadocia
  • 2.21.18 The philosopher’s response to our holy fathers
  • 2.21.21 Our holy fathers’ response to the philosopher through the same Bishop Leontius
  • 2.22.1 The philosopher’s response to the shared belief of the holy bishops
  • 2.22.3 The holy fathers’ response to the philosopher through the same Bishop Leontius
  • 2.22.7 The philosopher’s response
  • 2.22.8 The holy fathers’ hypothetical response to the philosopher about fire and radiance and light through the same Bishop Leontius
  • 2.22.17 The philosopher believes in the Holy Trinity
  • 2.23 The holy fathers continue to speak to the philosopher about a fount and river and water through Bishop Leontius
  • 2.24.1 And the philosopher
  • 2.24.2 The holy fathers’ response through the same Bishop Leontius
  • 2.24.3 The philosopher gives thanks and inquires about the Lord’s incarnation
  • 2.24.4 The holy fathers’ response to the philosopher through Bishop Leontius
  • 2.24.7 The philospher inquires about the Lord
  • 2.24.8 The response from the holy fathers through Macarius, the Bishop of Jerusalem
  • 2.24.14 The philosopher
  • 2.24.15 The holy fathers’ response through the same Macarius, the Bishop of Jerusalem
  • 2.25 Everyone is in harmony concerning the homoousius
  • 2.26 The synod jointly agrees to excommunicate the ungodly Arius and those on his side
  • 2.27 The publication of the catholic and apostolic faith set forth by the Council of Nicaea, at the time of the most God-loving Emperor Constantine, during the consulate of the illustrious Paulinus and Julian, 636 years after Alexander [the Great], on the 19th day in the month Desios, 13 days before the Kalends of July, in Nicaea, the metropolis of Bithynia
  • 2.28 The bishops’ descriptions of the faith
  • 2.29 The emperor rises from the throne and offers up words of thanksgiving to God
  • 2.30 Acesius, a Novatian bishop and those on his side
  • 2.31.1 The instructive message of the ecclesiastical principles
  • 2.31.2 Concerning the ones who say it is not necessary that Christians work
  • 2.31.3 Concerning being a priest
  • 2.31.4 Concerning the need to not let laymen into the pulpit
  • 2.31.5 Concerning Holy Baptism
  • 2.31.6 Concerning the Divine Meal and the mystery of Christ’s body and blood at it
  • 2.31.7 Concerning the resurrection of the dead
  • 2.31.8 That there is one church of God
  • 2.31.9 Concerning God’s foreknowledge and the world
  • 2.32.1 The ecclesiastical standards of the holy and great synod assembled at Nicaea; Concerning eunuchs castrating themselves
  • 2.32.2 Concerning pagans being brought forward to be appointed to an office
  • 2.32.3 Concerning those who have illegitimate children
  • 2.32.4 Concerning the appointment of bishops
  • 2.32.5 Concerning those who become excommunicated
  • 2.32.6 Concerning the special honors which have been ecclesiastically measured out to those who govern greater bishoprics
  • 2.32.7 Concerning the bishop in Aelia
  • 2.32.8 Concerning the ones who call themselves ‘The Pure Ones’ [the Novationists]
  • 2.32.9 Concerning the appointment of priests
  • 2.32.10 Concerning those who fall away and were appointed to office by mistake
  • 2.32.11 Concerning unnecessary transgressions
  • 2.32.12 Concerning those who remove themselves and again return to the world
  • 2.32.13 Concerning those who have a strong desire to participate in death
  • 2.32.14 Concerning catechumens who fall into sin
  • 2.32.15 Concerning the need to not transfer from one city to another
  • 2.32.16 Concerning those who do not remain long in the churches to which they were appointed
  • 2.32.17 Concerning the lending of clerics
  • 2.32.18 Concerning priests who receive the Lord’s Supper from deacons
  • 2.32.19 Concerning the ones who came to and were added to the catholic church by Paul of Samosata
  • 2.32.20 Concerning those who kneel on the Lord’s day
  • 2.33 Concerning the need to not depose those who are priests and have their own wife
  • 2.34.1 Concerning the unholy Melitius
  • 2.34.2 A synodical letter written by the synod of bishops at Nicaea to the holy ecclesiastical clergy of God and the laity of the orthodox faith in Alexandria and Egypt and the Pentapolis and Libya and in every place under heaven
  • 2.35.1 A general letter written by Eusebius, the Bishop of Caesarea Palestine
  • 2.35.8 The faith which was decreed at the synod
  • 2.36 The great Victor August Constantine to the bishops and people
  • 2.37.1 Emperor Constantine’s letter against Arius to the Alexandrians and all the orthodox
  • 2.37.10 Emperor Constantine’s letter which he sent from Nicaea to the bishops who were absent from the synod
  • 2.38 A catalogue of the holy bishops through whom the holy and great and ecumenical synod sent out the things decreed in it through them by the Holy Spirit to all the churches of God throughout the entire world

Book 3

  • 3.1 The things which were treated/written after the great synod
  • 3.2 The most God-loving Emperor Constantine’s unyielding haste concerning godly things
  • 3.3 The emperor’s letter to Eusebius Pamphili about the building of churches
  • 3.4 The emperor’s letter concerning the construction of holy books
  • 3.5 The emperor’s letter to Macarius, the bishop of Jerusalem about the Savior’s tomb
  • 3.6 The blessed Helen’s journey to Jerusalem
  • 3.7 The discovery of the holy cross of Christ
  • 3.8 The godly Constantine’s tribute
  • 3.9 Frumentius and Edesius and those in the middle of India
  • 3.10 The Iberians and Lazi and the holy captive woman among them
  • 3.11 Emperor Constantine’s Letter to Sapor, King of the Persians, concerning God’s providence for his people
  • 3.12 Concerning Constantia, the sister of the all-praiseworthy Emperor Constantine and the Arian presbyter whom she entrusted to his safekeeping
  • 3.13 The message of feigned repentance of Eusebius of Nicomedia and Theognis of Nicaea
  • 3.14 Part of Emperor Constantine’s letter to Athanasius
  • 3.15 The most God-loving Emperor Constantine’s letter to Alexander the bishop of Alexandria
  • 3.16 Part of the letter of Emperor Constantine written on behalf of Athanasius to the church of Alexandria
  • 3.17 Emperor Constantine’s letter to the synod which had gathered together at Tyre

 

Created by NJ 2-13-17

Last updated by NJ 7-20-17

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